Tribal Natural Resources News

The Show on KJZZ

Listen live weekdays at 9 a.m.

Native American tribes around the West are making critical decisions regarding the management of their natural resources — land, water, fossil fuels and renewable resources. The Tribal Natural Resources Desk aims to produce objective reporting to tell stories of tribes empowering themselves through stewardship and decision-making around their natural resources.
An argument for the protection of geoglyphs in Arizona
Geoglyphs are massive etchings on the land found found all over the world, including in Arizona, where development can threaten their preservation.
This Arizona seed bank keeps a Native agricultural past alive
Long before there were grocery stores and fast-food restaurants, ancient cultures found sustenance in the Southwest through innovative farming techniques. A nonprofit seed bank in southern Arizona is keeping that agricultural past alive, restoring traditional crops and foods that in some cases go back hundreds of years.
More news from the Fronteras Desk
Northern Arizona tribe to get federal aid for flood damage
President Joe Biden has approved a disaster declaration made by the Havasupai Tribe in northern Arizona, freeing up funds for flood damage as it prepares to reopen for tourists after nearly three years.
Biden administration releases new guidelines tribal consultation
President Joe Biden pledged to work closer with America’s tribes, and has taken a number of steps to fulfill that pledge. The president recently took another.
Volunteers document springs in sky island country
Although big water projects such as dams are front and center when Arizona cities talk about their water supply, the state’s wildlife relies on natural sources, like springs. A nonprofit is doing a survey on springs in the southern Arizona area known as sky island country.
Cocopah Tribe working to restore Colorado River’s native plants
After more than a century of dam building and development, the Colorado River ends as a trickle at the Arizona-Mexico border. The river was once the lifeblood of the Cocopah, or River People. The tribe has begun trying to return a sliver of that landscape to what it once was.
More news from the Tribal Natural Resources Desk
AZ Court of Appeals sides with San Carlos Apache Tribe in mine case
A proposed copper mine 70 miles east of Phoenix is facing another legal setback. The Arizona Court of Appeals has sided with the San Carlos Apache Tribe in its latest bid to keep Resolution Copper from moving forward.
Tribe to make water supply available to Rio Verde homes
The San Carlos Apache tribe has offered to make 65 million gallons of its Central Arizona Project water available while Rio Verde works out a long-term solution.
Environmental groups sue federal government over oil production lease approvals
Environmental groups are suing the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Interior Department Secretary Deb Haaland over an area that has been eyed for increased oil and gas development.
Utah tribe gathers to protest uranium mill near Bears Ears
Members of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe joined with members of the Grand Canyon Trust and others to protest White Mesa Mill uranium processing plant and the threats it might pose to local air and water quality.
$200K EPA study will test air, water at Cocopah Head Start facility
Researchers from Northern Arizona University and University of Arizona are collaborating with the Cocopah Indian Tribe to assess environmental health issues at a Head Start and day care facility. Concerns include possible air and water pollution from surrounding areas.
Tribe says Arizona built border barrier against its wishes
The Cocopah Indian Tribe said Friday that the state of Arizona acted against its wishes by stacking shipping containers on its land to prevent illegal border crossings.
Sage being poached in from Native land. Heres why
As sage has ballooned in popularity, journalists and activists are uncovering a dirty truth about the sacred desert plant: Sage is being poached in massive quantities.
Hear more interviews from The Show
Navajo discuss uranium exposure legislation
During the Cold War, the uranium industry dug hundreds of mines on the Navajo Nation. Officials with the tribe met recently to discuss the impacts of uranium exposure to tribal members.
Project to provide water for White Mountain Apaches
The Bureau of Reclamation recently opened an Environmental Impact Statement on the Miner Flat Dam at Fort Apache to public comments.
Navajo officials lead tour of abandoned uranium sites near Cameron
Navajo President Jonathan Nez and tribal officials met with Arizona Congressman Tom O’Halleran and others recently to visit abandoned uranium mines near Cameron.
Tribes, conservationists back Grijalvas Great Bend of the Gila Conservation Act
For thousands of years, tribes living in what is now the Southwestern United States gathered at the Gila River. They left a legacy that conservationists would like to preserve, and Congressman Raul Grijalva has introduced legislation that could make that a reality.
Tribes along the Colorado River are finally getting their say on water policy
Historically, tribes along the Colorado River have been left out of decision-making about it, despite being senior water rights holders. But that's starting to change.
One of the oldest independent record labels in the country is in Tempe
One of the oldest independent record labels in the country is right here in Tempe. We have more on this very special Valley gem.
House approves bill to let tribes to lease Colorado River water
Sponsored by Democratic Reps. Raul Grijalva and Greg Stanton, the bill authorizes the Colorado River Indian Tribes to lease water gained through conservation.
New policy giving tribes a say could slow down AZ Snowbowl development
A change in policy by the Biden administration to give tribal voices more of a seat at the table has led to a controversy about proposed changes at Arizona Snowbowl in Flagstaff.

Pages