Grand Canyon

The Show on KJZZ

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Grand Canyon at night
The National Park Service has announced that the Grand Canyon National Park has officially received its International Dark Sky Park certification. The park has been working for three years to meet the requirements that were set forth, specifically to retrofit 67 percent of the 5,000 exterior light fixtures.
Imagine you’re hiking in the Grand Canyon and you stumble upon a slab of fallen rock. On it are some odd indentations like overly-baked footprints. That’s exactly what happened to a group of hikers on the Bright Angel Trail.
Hear More Stories From KJZZ's The Show
One of the most extreme Grand Canyon challenges is called a rim-to-rim-to-rim, which usually means running down the South Rim, through the canyon, up the North Rim — then all the way back again. Famed trail runner Cat Bradley has done it eight times.
Every year, more than 5 million people trek to Grand Canyon National Park for a spectacular view. But once you venture down one of its steep trails, you start to enter another world. And like anywhere that’s hard to reach, the Grand Canyon’s backcountry is rich with stories. In "Below The Rim," we tell you a few of them.
National Geographic writer Kevin Fedarko and photographer Pete McBride take a 650-mile hike through the canyon, and consider what proposed development projects in and around it would mean for one of the country’s most iconic landscapes.
Each year more than 5 million people visit the Grand Canyon, but only about 1 percent of them make it to the Colorado River at the bottom. An even smaller percentage of those visitors are Arizonans. KJZZ's Sarah Ventre shared what it was like to hike the Grand Canyon for the first time.
New research supports the long-held hypothesis that the Grand Canyon is as young as 6 million years. That’s what geologists originally believed before a different study claimed it was tens of millions of years older. The study compares the western Grand Canyon with the Grand Wash Cliffs.
In the early 1900s, two brothers, Emery and Ellsworth Kolb, saw an economic opportunity at the Grand Canyon. But it didn’t come without constant determination — much like the Kolb Studio itself, which has clung to the side of the Grand Canyon for more than a century.
In the early 1900s brothers Emery and Ellsworth Kolb saw an economic opportunity at the Grand Canyon. But it didn’t come without constant determination, much like the Kolb Studio itself, which has clung to the side of the Grand Canyon for more than a century.
Want to feel like you're on a whitewater rafting trip through the Grand Canyon without getting wet? Google has taken its all-seeing eyes down the Colorado, through the Canyon, in a partnership with the advocacy group American Rivers.

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